In the digital age, Kodak continues to make film

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In the digital age, Kodak continues to make film
In the digital age, Kodak continues to make film

In the midst of the digital era, Kodak will continue to sell film for the cinema for an undetermined amount of time, thanks to the fact that the five largest studios in Hollywood, Disney, NBCUniversal, Paramount, Sony and Warner Bros, have reached an agreement with Kodak to continue buying film for the cinema for an undetermined amount of time, so that, what is currently the last company that continues to produce film, can continue to manufacturing this material.

For us to understand this, it’s a bit like they’ve put the pacemaker that will keep this classic form of filmmaking alive for a few more years.

As the Hollywood Reporter explains, both parties (the film studios and Kodak) came from a technically extinct agreement that kept the photo company alive between 2015 and 2017, after it went bankrupt. The digital revolution caused the income of this mythical company to fall by 96%, and no one, not even the shareholders themselves, understood what the value of this outdated product could be in the modern era.

Kodak film is not cheap

The price of a 35mm celluloid cartridge can cost up to 1,000 dollars for every 11 minutes of duration, which can raise the average price of a production by 40,000 to 80,000 dollars only to end up, in most cases, with the images being displayed on a digital copy.

The Irishman, 100% kodak film
The Irishman, 100% kodak film

Savefilm.org, led by Christopher Nolan, was responsible for saving Kodak from the crisis announced in 2014. Nolan commanded a coalit